Q: WHY IS THE WESTSIDE OF BEND THE BEST POSSIBLE LOCATION FOR THE NEW OSU-CASCADES CAMPUS?

A: The Westside location offers OSU-Cascades many benefits. Needed infrastructure and services are readily available and would not require the significant investment in sewer, water and roads. The location’s close proximity to Central Oregon Community College and the Graduate Research Building offers convenient access to business and organizations that has lead to partnerships for student research and internships. To date over 200 students have participated in internships throughout the region.

Q: WILL THE NEW CAMPUS MAKE TRAFFIC PROBLEMS ON THE WESTSIDE OF BEND EVEN WORSE?

A: One of the benefits of an urban campus is the accessibility to transit and alternative forms of transportation such as biking and walking. Traffic studies indicate the 10-acre OSU-Cascades campus will generate far less traffic than 80,000 sq ft of retail development, also an approved use for this location.

The university is already actively involved with the process of increasing mass transit options for the area which means students benefit, as well as neighbors and nearby businesses. (OSU-Cascades goal is for 65% of the students to live within a ½ mile radius of the 10 acre parcel.)

Even with the inclusion of OSU-Cascades campus, the City of Bend and Kittleson and Associates – a nationally recognized traffic and parking engineering firm – determined the infrastructure is sufficient.

Q: WILL THERE BE SUFFICIENT PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES AT THE NEW CAMPUS?

A:  Yes. Experts who studied parking patterns at similar-sized campuses and in similar-sized cities recommended 320 parking spaces for the 10-acre OSU-Cascades campus.

OSU-Cascades is actively partnering with the community to mitigate traffic and parking concerns. They are contributing funds to expand busing to the proposed campus location. They will adjust class times to avoid peak congestion created nearby elementary, middle and high schools. And, freshmen will be required to live on campus and the university’s goal is for 65% of the student body to live within a 1/2 mile radius.

In addition:

  • It’s expected that 300 students will actually be living on campus and will not be driving or parking on campus.
  • Approximately 35% of the students are part-time students and will only be on campus a few hours each week.
  • Many classes have an online component, and some classes are exclusively online.

READ MORE to learn about OSU-Cascades’ studies and plans for traffic & parking.

Q: WHY HASN’T OSU-CASCADES ENGAGED IN A MASTER PLANNING PROCESS FOR ITS CAMPUS AND EXPANSION?

A: Master planning is required for developments of over 40 acres in size. OSU-Cascades owns a 10 acre parcel on Chandler Avenue, too small to require a master plan. Because master planning is expensive (costing $1-2 million), it is not done until the land is owned. If OSU-Cascades purchases additional land adjacent to the 10 acres, a master plan will be prepared for city approval.

OTHER SITE LOCATIONS EVALUATED

Deschutes County/Stevens Road Tract: 640 Acres that are part of the Common School Fund Property Trust
  • All but 12 acres are outside of the UGB Boundary
  • Must be purchased at market value, per the guidelines of the Trust
  • Major gas transmission lines run through this property.
  • From the mid 1950’s to 1972, 40 acres of this property was leased to Deschutes County for landfill and sewage disposal.  In 1972 it was closed.
  • PBS firm performed an engineering and environmental assessment performed in late 2008, early 2009. They studied the previous dump site and found the presence of asbestos containing hazardous materials at depths as shallow as 2.5 feet.
  • Presence of collapsed lava tubes.
  • Lack of development access, see infrastructure cost below.
  • Lack of services, amenities for students and faculty, which would lead to urban sprawl
  • Not close to COCC or the OSU Cascades Graduate Research Building

    Read the Stevens Road Tract Conceptual Master Plan Here

Juniper Ridge
  • The University “Set Aside” acres are outside of the UGB BoundaryJuniper_Ridge_Costs
  • Would require $20–30 Million to satisfy state transportation requirements for access from Hwy. 97, money that is not available from the state
  • Water, sewer and road infrastructure would require at least an additional $10 million to $12 million
  • The sewer interceptor alone could cost $6 to 10 million
  • Lack of services, amenities for students and faculty, which would lead to urban sprawl.
  • Not close to COCC or the OSU Cascades Graduate Research Building

    Read the Juniper Ridge Concept Plan Here

Buildings in the Old Mill, with proximity to the Graduate Research Center
  • The initial search focused on existing buildings in this area.  With the escalating asking prices, the cost to convert them for university use was prohibitive.
  • Concern over additional availability for future growth
  • Concern over land parcels in close proximity for future growth
  • Concern over available land parcels in close proximity for future growth and student housing.